Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Interested in nootropics for accelerating musical instrument prowess
Tony G
post Oct 21, 2012, 10:10 AM
Post #1


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 2
Joined: Oct 21, 2012
Member No.: 34631



Hi all, glad I stumbled upon this place. This is why I'm here:

Pushing 40 years old, been playing guitar for close to a decade, now venturing into more "intellectual" music like jazz/jazz fusion. Want to get good...really good. Not sure where I should start posting in this forum but I'm basically trying to understand:

1) The differences (if any) between learning a musical instrument when one is younger (20's) vs. 40's. I don't understand concepts like motor learning, muscle memory, etc. but I believe them to be imperative to the physical elements of learning the instrument.

2) What nootropics can help with the physical aspect of learning the instrument. I have a good ear and right now the key is getting the hands to do what I want them to do faster. I understand that it's putting in the hours. Realistically I can probably get 3-4 "quality" hours a day if planned out well and am willing to allocate that time.

In regard to current nootropics this is my morning wake-up stack:

1) Aniracetam - 750 mg
2) Choline - 1 gram
3) ALCAR - 3 g
4) R-ALA - 200 mg

Other things:

5) Reservatrol - 1 gram
6) Green Tea - (approx. 240 mg caffeine)
7) Rhodiola - not sure of the exact dose

Basically the plan is to work out in the morning 3-4 times a week and on the other days wake up at the same time but practice guitar.

Other odds and ends...I'm a systems/network person by trade and am definitely digging the computer sciencey section of this forum even though the predominate language I code in currently is only Windows PowerShell 2.0. Regardless I'm always intersted in learning algorithms/coding techniques in C type languages to apply to what I'm doing.

If someone could point me to the appropriate sub-forums that would be great.

Much thanks!

- Tony
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
pooFox
post Oct 22, 2012, 07:05 AM
Post #2


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 12
Joined: Oct 22, 2012
Member No.: 34633



did you post this also in another section? I thought I replied, but didn't notice you had already been playing a while. I think the best use of your time would be playing with other musicians who are far beyond your level. You'll learn more and have more fun than playing hours by yourself.

And don't your fingers suck first thing in the morning? I can barely squeeze the honey out of the bear sometimes...Congrats on your time management skills though.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
kushman
post Oct 22, 2012, 05:24 PM
Post #3


Awakening
***

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 174
Joined: Sep 29, 2012
Member No.: 34576



Perfect pitch is attainable....just practice and let your fingers do the walking
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
addseo1118
post May 07, 2015, 05:45 AM
Post #4


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 4
Joined: Apr 04, 2015
Member No.: 37633



but I believe them to be imperative to the sbobet physical elements of learning the instrument.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 16th July 2019 - 07:41 PM


Home     |     About     |    Research     |    Forum     |    Feedback  


Copyright BrainMeta. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use  |  Last Modified Tue Jan 17 2006 12:39 am

BrainMeta is supported by:

The Neurological Foundation & CerebralHealth.com

BrainMeta is enhanced by:

UVISI: Universal Virtual Intelligence Singularity Infinity
info@uvisi.com